VEGANZYME

$49.95

VeganZyme is an advanced, full-spectrum blend of the most powerful digestive and systemic enzymes that support digestion, boost the immune system, and encourage functional balance throughout the entire body. VeganZyme – a digestive and systemic enzyme for healthy digestion.† 120 vegetarian capsules

Learn How You Can Benefit From Enzyme Support With VeganZyme!

Why is VeganZyme the Best Enzyme Support Available?

  • VeganZyme provides both digestive support and systemic enzyme support.
  • VeganZyme supports the entire body.
  • VeganZyme is the most comprehensive enzyme blend ever developed.
  • VeganZyme contains stable, plant-based digestive enzymes with a wide pH range.
  • Vegan friendly, gluten free, GMO free.
  • Made in the USA.

The Top 5 Reasons You Need Enzyme Support

1. Benefits Digestion

As you age, your body begins to produce less and less enzymes. Enzymes are necessary for proper digestion and nutrient absorption. VeganZyme is able to fill the gaps to enhance digestion and increase the nutritional value of food. VeganZyme may also be useful in reducing bloating, gas or indigestion from food sensitivities.

2. Supports Your Entire Body

We can liken systemic enzymes in relationship to the body to what oil is to the engine of your car. The key word is "lubrication" which keeps the engine moving smoothly. Think of systemic enzymes as power-ups for those natural processes in your body that promote functional balance.

3. Vegan-Friendly Formula

VeganZyme is the most complete vegan digestive and systemic enzyme blend available anywhere.

4. Unmatched Quality

VeganZyme is produced here in the United States. Completely void of toxic additives, VeganZyme is the most premium enzyme supplement available. No other product can compare.

5. Recognized Effective

The efficacy of enzymes Enzyme have been recognized by the International Journal of Oncology, Lancet, Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Digestion, International Journal of Immunotherapy, American Journal of Digestive Disease and Nutrition, and others.

Amazing Statistics Concerning Enzymes and Digestion

  • The National Institute of Health states that nearly 70 million Americans experience digestive disorders.
  • Enzymes are fundamental to digestion. Without enzymes, macronutrients are expelled without use.
  • Cooking your fruits and vegetables may destroy their natural enzyme content.
  • Those who experience spastic colon may be deficient in lipase which is an enzyme that supports fat digestion.
  • Your body does not produce the enzyme cellulase; therefore, it must be taken in supplement form.
  • Statistics indicate that approximately one in four people may be lactose intolerant.

What are the Benefits of VeganZyme?

  • Enzyme support from a full spectrum advantage.
  • Promotes digestion support and nutrient absorption.
  • Supports your body's ability break down toxic compounds.
  • Breaks down phytic acid from plants, grains and seeds to increase nutrient availability.
  • Supports normal blood pressure.
  • Promotes candida cleansing.
  • Defends against harmful, metabolic by-products.

What are the Top 3 Questions People Ask About VeganZyme?

1. Why do I need enzymes? Enzymes are responsible for constructing, synthesizing, carrying, dispensing, delivering, and eliminating the ingredients and chemicals our body uses. Digestive enzymes break down food to release nutrients for energy production, cell growth, and repair. Systemic enzymes support the body's processes.

2. Does food contain enzymes? Raw, live foods contain enzymes; cooked and processed foods are void of enzymes. A digestive enzyme supplement enhances digestion to get the full nutritional value of food.

3. Are enzymes harmful? Not at all! As active protein molecules, enzymes do not accumulate in the body.

Additional Tips for Effective Enzyme Support

  • Take supplemental enzymes with meals to support digestion.
  • Take additional enzymes between meals for systemic and immune system support.
  • Capsules can be pulled apart and the contents mixed with purified water or juice.

VeganZyme is Risk-Free For You To Try

At OAWHealth we are confident you will see and feel the health benefiting results of enzyme supplementation with VeganZyme.
If you aren’t absolutely satisfied...if you aren’t feeling better, you’re protected by our…
100% No-Risk 30-Day Money Back Guarantee
If you are not satisfied with your results, just let us know and we’ll send you a prompt refund. No questions asked.

† Results may vary.

Veganzyme Supplement Facts

 Ingredients

Proprietary Blend

  • Amylase Alpha Amylase breaks down starch and glycogen into dextrin, glucose and maltose. It is produced by the fermentation of Aspergillus oryzae.
  • Protease with DPPIV Protease with DPPIV is a blend of proteases that mimic the body's natural DPPIV enzymes. This enzyme blend breaks down protein and gluten. It's derived from Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger, and Bacillus subtilis.
  • Lipase
 Lipase is a lipolytic enzyme that breaks down fats and oils. It's produced by the fermentation of Aspergillus niger.
  • Papain

 Papain helps digest proteins and can also be used for reducing swelling when used systemically. It is extracted from papaya (Carica papaya).
  • Hemicellulase Hemicellulase breaks down hemicellulose found in fruits, vegetables, grains, and cereals. It's produced by the fermentation of Trichoderma reesei.
  • Serrapeptase
 Serrapeptase is a systemic enzyme that breaks down fibrin and mucous to support joint function and cardiovascular health. It's produced by the fermentation of Serratia marcescens.
  • Invertase

 Invertase breaks down sucrose and table sugar. It is produced by the fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
  • Nattokinase Nattokinase is a powerful systemic enzyme that breaks down fibrin and mucous. It's derived from Bacillus natto or Bacillus subtilis natto.
  • Alpha Galactosidase
 Alpha galactosidase breaks down complex carbohydrates like grains and legumes and non-digestible sugars called oligosaccharides that cause abdominal discomfort, gas and bloating. It is produced by fermentation of Aspergillus niger.
  • Catalase
 Catalase is an antioxidant enzyme that helps the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. It's derived from Aspergillus niger.
  • Pectinase

 Pectinase breaks down pectin and fiber found in fruits and vegetables. It's derived from Aspergillus niger.
  • Bromelain Bromelain helps digest proteins and also offers systemic benefits. Bromelain is an extract from the stem or juice of pineapple (Ananas comosus).
  • Glucoamylase
 Glucoamylase enhances the digestion and nutritional value of starch. It is produced by fermentation of Aspergillus niger.
  • Glucose Oxidase
 Rarely found in enzyme supplements, glucose oxidase breaks down glucose. It's derived from Aspergillus niger.
  • Lactase Lactase breaks down lactose (milk sugar). Lactase is derived from the fermentation of Aspergillus oryzae.
  • Cellulase
 Cellulase helps the digestion of fruits and vegetables and increases their nutritional value. It's derived from Trichoderma reesei and Bacillus licheniformis.
  • Phytase
 Phytase breaks down phytic acid in seeds, corn, and nuts. It's derived from Aspergillus niger. Phytic acid binds to nutrients and makes them unabsorbable. Breaking down phytic acid helps keep these nutrients from becoming unavailable.
  • Maltase
 Maltase breaks down maltose in cereals, legumes, and barley. It is produced by the fermentation of Aspergillus oryzae or from barley malt.
  • Beta Glucanase

 Beta glucanase breaks down beta glucans in high fiber foods, grains, and cereals. It's produced by fermentation of Trichoderma reesei. Beta glucans also slow down natural intestinal contractions, beta glucanase helps to balance this out.
  • Xylanase Xylanase breaks down xylose found in high fiber foods, grains, and cereals. Xylanase is produced by fermentation of Trichoderma reesei.

Other Ingredients

  • Vegetable capsule (cellulose)
 Vegetable capsules are used instead of standard capsules made with animal-sourced protein.
  • Organic gum acacia
 Organic gum acacia is a natural flow agent that ensures product quality and consistency.
  • Organic rice hulls Organic rice hulls are a natural flow agent that ensure product quality and consistency.

†Results may vary.

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Suggested Use

Take 2 capsules twice daily. For digestive support, take enzymes at mealtime with first bite of food. For systemic support, take at least 30 minutes before or 2 hours after a meal with a full glass of purified water.

Warning

Keep out of reach of children. Consult your healthcare provider if pregnant, nursing, taking blood thinners or for any additional concerns.

Results may vary.
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  5. Heyll U, Münnich U, Senger V. [Proteolytic enzymes as an alternative in comparison with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) in the treatment of degenerative and inflammatory rheumatic disease: systematic review]. Med Klin (Munich). 2003 Nov 15;98(11):609-15. Review. German.
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Frequently Asked Questions About VeganZyme

What are enzymes?

Digestive enzymes, such as amylase, protease and lipase break down foods into smaller components that are more easily absorbed. Enzymes are secreted throughout the digestive tract. Beginning in the mouth, starches and fats break down as they are chewed and mixed with saliva, which contains amylase (ptyalin) and lingual lipase. Once swallowed, it travels to the stomach where protease pepsin begins to break down protein into smaller peptides and amino acids. This mixture is transferred to the first part of the small intestine. A number of proteases (trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen, for example) are released with pancreatic lipase and amylase from the pancreas in their inactive forms into the small intestine where they are activated.

Systemic enzymes help other processes in the body and control swelling, reduce fibrin (a blood-clotting factor) levels, thin mucus, support cardiovascular and joint health, and more. Systemic enzymes have been used in many types of therapy and it has been suggested that enzyme supplementation is probably beneficial for most people.

Can VeganZyme be taken by people who are not vegan?

Yes. VeganZyme is appropriate for everyone.

What Does FCC Mean?

FCC stands for Food and Chemical Codex. This codex standardizes the activity units of enzymes for easy comparison. Historically, enzymes have been measured using different units at the discretion of the manufacturer or scientist measuring activity. There is now an attempt within the nutraceutical industry to use standardized measurements so that materials are comparable from product to product and between suppliers.

Compounding this problem is the fact that there are often many grades of raw materials available from raw material suppliers, meaning that you must multiply the activity per gram of the particular enzyme by the weight of the amount that is used per serving in order to calculate the activity of the amount that you are ingesting. This can be listed in different ways on supplement labels, so it is important to make sure you understand what you're getting. The VeganZyme label indicates the activity per serving for ease of use.

If you are trying to compare a number of different products that use different units of activity, it may not be possible since they may measure completely different actions for which there is no equivalency.

What happens to enzyme levels as we age?

Research has shown that older people and people with chronic disease have fewer enzymes in their saliva, urine, and tissue. Enzymes are essential and if your enzyme levels are dropping, supplemental digestive enzymes can help improve your health and bring your systems into balance.

Is VeganZyme safe for children?

Yes, VeganZyme is safe for infants, toddlers, and young children.

Should I take VeganZyme with prescription medications?

In most cases, digestive enzymes can safely be taken with medications. However, discuss this with your healthcare provider. Prescription blood thinning agents are one item of caution and absolutely require a consultation with your physician before beginning an enzyme regimen.

Will VeganZyme impact the body’s ability to produce its own enzymes?

No. Hormones, not enzymes, control the secretion of enzymes.

What is the difference between Wobenzyme N and VeganZyme?

Wobenzyme N is a popular enzyme formula containing 5 essential enzymes: pancreatin, papain, bromelain, trypsin, chymotrypsin. It is a well respected pancreatic enzyme formula; however,it is made with animal-derived enzymes. Additionally, it does not contain the wide range of proteases, cellulases, and other enzymes like glucose oxidase in VeganZyme, so you cannot use it as either as a systemic or digestive enzyme blend.

If you are looking for a pancreatic enzyme better than Wobenzyme N, we suggest looking at Univase Forte. We would also suggest using both Univase Forte and VeganZyme.

What is the difference between animal and vegetarian based enzyme supplements?

Many digestive and systemic enzyme supplements contain animal sourced enzymes, usually pancreatic tissue from pigs. Many people prefer vegetarian supplements which tend to produce more digestive and systemic activity than animal enzyme supplements.

Vegetarian enzyme supplements are active over a broad pH range and start working almost immediately after consumption. They are also produced in a controlled environment without toxic chemicals or ingredients. Animal enzyme supplements are obtained from slaughterhouse pigs, which may have been given vaccinations, hormones, GMO food, steroids, antibiotics and other harmful substances.

Results may vary.

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