How to Get Rid of Fatty Liver Disease

How to Get Rid of Fatty Liver Disease

March 11th, 2013 by Loretta Lanphier, NP, CN, CH, HHP

How to Get Rid of Fatty Liver Disease

Keeping your liver supported and strong is one of the most important steps you can take to maintain overall wellness. This critically hard-working organ, which is located in the right abdominal area, has been called the “laboratory of the body,” and for many good reasons. Unfortunately, more and more people are developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and don’t even know it.

Researchers estimate that the liver performs over 500 functions in the body. Some of these include:

  • Filtering all food and liquids, assimilating and distributing nutrients, and removing toxins and waste products.
  • Creating bile, necessary for digestion of fats and other substances
  • Burning and metabolizing fat and calories in the body
  • Regulating hormones
  • Purifying the blood and removes damaged blood cells
  • Performing many necessary circulatory functions
  • Balancing blood sugar
  • Regulating fluid levels in the body
  • Storing and distributing vitamins, minerals, and other crucial nutrients
  • Boosting the immune system

The liver is actively involved in keeping your body free from disease of all types. It is also true that a poorly operating liver can contribute to a mired of illnesses and debilitating health conditions. There are many types of liver disease and dysfunction, but the most common and hazardous is called fatty liver.

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What is Fatty Liver Disease?

Fatty liver is also known as Non-Alcoholic Steatorrhoeic Hepatitis (NASH) or Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD). The technical description of fatty liver is quite complex, but basically fatty liver disease is just as it sounds – too much fat in and around the liver. In fact, healthy liver tissue can be displaced by unhealthy fats, and vacant spaces within the liver are abnormally occupied by fat. In addition, those with fatty liver disease will often accumulate excess fat surrounding the organ itself, contributing to an overabundance of body fat in the abdominal area.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease affects as many as one in five Americans, according to the American Liver Association. And for those with diabetes, says VA physician-researcher Kenneth Cusi, MD, the rate may be as high as four in five. According to the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 32.5 million Americans (21.4%) have hepatic steatosis and 28.8 million adults (19%) have NAFLD. They defined NAFLD as the presence of hepatic steatosis on ultrasound in the absence of elevated alcohol consumption.

A healthy liver is typically reddish in color because the blood is meant to flow through channels in the interior of the liver composed of layers of liver cells. This is the way the liver is meant to function – as a very efficient filter for absorbing nutrients and ridding the body of toxins. A fatty liver becomes clogged with excess fat cells, seriously hampering the liver’s ability to do its many vital jobs. A fatty liver loses its red color and becomes heavier, enlarged, and greasy yellow in appearance. These abnormalities can often be discovered by an ultrasound scan or via a liver biopsy.

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What Causes Fatty Liver Disease?

Some common causes of fatty liver include:

  • An unhealthy lifestyle of poor diet (high in animal fat. preservatives, and toxic chemicals), lack of exercise, and poor hydration.
  • Obesity. This is probably the biggest factor in fatty liver, especially for people over 30.
  • Medications. Many are very hard on the liver including pain drugs (NSAIDs and narcotics), corticosteroids, certain antibiotics (especially tetracycline), and others. Some causes are associated with the drug tamoxifen (used to prevent breast cancer recurrence).
  • Complications of pregnancy
  • Exposure to toxic cleaning products, personal care products, water, food, the air, etc.
  • Toxic chemicals such as glyphosate
  • Excess alcohol consumption.
  • May also occur in people affected by hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland), high blood cholesterol and polycystic ovarian syndrome.

Simply put, the harder your force your liver to work because of exposure to hazardous substances and a high-fat, nutrient-poor diet, the greater your risk for fatty liver as well as other types of liver dysfunction.

What Are the Symptoms and Complications of Fatty Liver?

Symptoms that may point toward fatty liver disease include:

  • Being overweight, especially around the abdomen
  • Pain and tenderness near the liver
  • Elevated liver enzymes (blood test)
  • Possible gall stones
  • High Cholesterol and/or blood triglycerides (blood test)
  • Difficulty losing weight. If you are having a difficult time taking off pounds, it may be because your fatty liver has reverted to storing fat instead of metabolizing it.
  • A weakened immune system. This can open one up to a number of autoimmune and other harmful conditions.
  • Chronic fatigue. When the liver is not able to rid the body of excess fat and other waste products, one will likely feel sluggish most of the time.
  • Greater risk for diabetes. Fatty liver can result in insulin resistance, a key factor in diabetes. A recent study estimated that about 70% of individuals diagnosed with type-2 diabetes may also have fatty liver disease.
  • Syndrome X. Also known as Metabolic Syndrome X, this condition can also be a complication of fatty liver. Syndrome X involves a number of factors including abnormally high blood pressure and/or insulin levels, too much cholesterol, and excess body fat around the waistline. Metabolic Syndrome increases risk for diabetes, stroke, and cardiac disease.

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How Can Fatty Liver Be Treated or Prevented?

Obviously, prevention is always the best medicine. Fatty liver disease is definitely a “lifestyle” disease (in most cases) that can be prevented and even eliminated by making healthy choices. These include:

  • A healthy diet composed mainly of nutrient-rich foods such as fresh, organic fruits and vegetables, essential fatty acids and plant-based protein sources.
  • Consuming a healthy fresh juice Liver Detox 3-4 times weekly.
  • An ample supply of pure filtered water. A well-hydrated liver is a happy liver that can perform its many duties optimally.
  • Supplementation (and pure food sources) of antioxidants such as vitamins C and natural E (containing tocopherols and tocotrienols).
  • Supplementing with N-acetylcysteine.
  • Liver supporting organic/wild-crafted herbs such as Milk Thistle seed, Wildcrafted Chanca Piedra (helps with liver stones), Fringetree bark, Dandelion root, Organic Nettles root and Organic Turmeric Root. There are several reasons to use the milk thistle seed rather than silymarin extract. Using the whole herb is recommended as often it will have a more balanced effect. The milk thistle extract silymarin, for instance, has proven useful in treating liver disease. However, the main drawback to using silymarin is that, if a healthcare professional prescribes other drugs, such as steroids, silymarin can interfere with the liver’s ability to detoxify them. Milk thistle seed has the same healing effect on the liver without interfering with the organ’s ability to detoxify drugs or environmental chemicals. It also has a side benefit of normalizing blood lipids as the liver heals.
  • Resveratrol. In September 2015, researchers reported that resveratrol has beneficial effects in individuals with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Resveratrol supplementation ameliorated the severity of hepatic steatosis and lowered the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT) compared to placebo.
  • A regular program of physical exercise. Exercise helps the liver to purify as well as helps the body to effectively move toxins and wastes out of the body. I highly recommend rebounding which helps with lymphatic drainage and allows one to effectively lose weight.
  • Healthy weight. As stated above, obesity is one of the top allies of fatty liver disease.
  • Liver cleansing. Choose an effective and non-toxic liver cleanse product or protocol that will effectively flush, purify and support your liver so that it can operate at peak efficiency. There are many herbs that are great for the liver, but they should always be either be organic or wild-crafted. Even if you do your best to live a clean life, performing a liver cleanse 2-3 times yearly is highly recommended, to “head off trouble at the pass,” so to speak.

Research & Resources

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Loretta Lanphier is a Naturopathic Practitioner (Traditional), Certified Clinical Nutritionist, Holistic Health Practitioner and Certified Clinical Herbalist as well as the CEO / Founder of Oasis Advanced Wellness in The Woodlands TX. She has studied and performed extensive research in health science, natural hormone balancing, anti-aging techniques, nutrition, natural medicine, weight loss, herbal remedies, non-toxic cancer support and is actively involved in researching new natural health protocols and products.  A 14 year stage 3 colon cancer survivor, Loretta is able to relate to both-sides-of-the-health-coin as patient and practitioner when it comes to health and wellness. “My passion is counseling others about what it takes to keep the whole body healthy using natural and non-toxic methods.” Read Loretta’s health testimony Cancer: The Path to Healing. Loretta is Contributor and Editor of the worldwide E-newsletter Advanced Health & Wellness. Check out Oasis Advanced Wellness and our natural skin care Oasis Serene Botanicals.

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  • sandra adams

    I need help the dr.told me I have a fatty liver I also need to lose 20 pounds also have chrones I do not drink
    what should I do I brought dandy lion tea to cleanse my liver

  • M Ross

    All the suggestions here are great. Loretta, you might take a look at the clinical research on 2 g a day of acetyl carnitine by an Italian group. It’s not an herb but along with diet changes, adding carnitine had some good results. I don’t remember the authors but you can find on pubmed.

  • i have fatty liver and take antibiotics for my other illness also Zoloft for depression way would u recommend for me to rid this disease of fatty liver.I don’t drink alcohol but I smoke cigarettes.Please can any Dr help?

  • janet

    what is fatty tissues around liver

  • Jaimi

    Hi dr I need help I’m a type 1 diabetic 16 y/o girl and ever since I was 7 I couldn’t control my diabetes and when my mum passed away 2 years ago I’ve been really bad with it I’ve only now started to get back on track but because I wasn’t looking after myself I now have an enlarged liver and pancreas all due to not looking after myself and a fatty build up I try my hardest but nothing is really working. I’m willing to try anything as it is putting my self esteem down because I have a fat gut. I never was fat I alway had a flat stomach but now it’s really big and I feel terrible about it.

    • Hi Jaimi – Please talk to a local functional medicine practitioner who can give you direction for your specific health concerns.

  • Jeanne

    Hi, I have liver cirrhosis. I started out with fatty liver, then nash, and then my Dr told me I had stage 2 liver chirrosis about 7 years ago. I am really struggling with fatigue, all over pain and unable to loose any weight. I feel like if I could loose weight, I may feel better, but I lack the energy to exercise regularly. Any suggestions? I’m on xifaxan for hepatic encephalopathy, lactulose, pristiq, ropenirole, etc.

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